Tag Archives: Parenting

Top Ten Most Read Posts of the Year

‘Tis the season… for lists! Of all kind. We’ve been seeing them all month, from the Best Books of the Year lists to Christmas Wish Lists to Top Nine Instagram photos, we like lists. So today I’m joining in with my Ten Most Read Posts of the Year, and tomorrow I’ll give you my list of What I’ve Learned This Year.

As you will see from the titles, most are parenting related, but #9 hits marriage and #5 politics. I’ve excluded my Books, Speaking & About pages, though those fell into the most viewed category. Starting with #10…

10. Despite Less Drama, Life with Teen Boys is No Cakewalk

9.  If My Plain, Old, Grey Sweatshirt Could Talk…  

8.  Moms & Dads, Is This is Us?

7.  IRL for a Pastor’s Family

6.  Dear Precious Teen Girls, What I Really Really Want You to Hear

5.  In Consideration of the Inauguration

4.  Underneath “13 Reasons Why”

3.  Moms, Do You Know How Your Daughter Sees Herself?

2.  8 Things Parents Can Do Now to Shape the Teens Years Ahead**

  1. Sounding the Siren on the Teen Suicide and Mental Health Crisis

Was one of these, or another a favorite of yours? One of my personal favorites didn’t make the list; I wrote it for Rooted Ministry: How Parenting Out of Weakness Strengthened My Relationship With My Teen.

**8 Things Parents Can Do Now to Shape the Teens Years Ahead kicked off a popular blog series last spring that I am now preparing to present this winter/spring as a 6 week parenting class! If you are local and want to know more about this be sure to follow me on Instagram and/or subscribe to my newsletter.

And if you think others would benefit from any of these posts or my blog this coming year, your “share” is always appreciated. Until tomorrow.

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How Parenting Out of Weakness Strengthened My Relationship With My Teen

“Can I talk to Dad now?”

Right in mid-sentence, my college daughter interrupted me and asked for the phone to be handed over to my husband. She had called me – upset and stressed out – needing someone to talk to, but then abruptly decided my husband was actually the one she preferred. While not easily offended, I would be lying if I said this didn’t bother me at all. I’m thankful she likes to talk to her dad, but what about me? Couldn’t we just all be on speaker?

I desperately wanted to know what she was thinking, experiencing, and doing, but every time we talked it felt like I was walking a fine line, not knowing what question or comment would push her too far and cause her to retreat. Even before that night I had sensed her shutting me out, and I couldn’t figure out why.

To find out why, and how it has led to better communication with my daughter follow me over to Rooted Ministry here.

 

If you find this article helpful, please share. I regularly write and speak about parenting issues, teens, and Christian living. To receive new blogs in your inbox, please subscribe!

Moms & Dads, Is This is Us?

Have you see this week’s episode of NBC’s ‘This is Us?’ If not, consider this your partial *spoiler alert!*

I think everyone in America loves this show because it depicts what real life is like dealing with the messiness of relationships and muck of this broken world. We identify with the characters, and see in them some of the same heart issues we struggle to deal honestly with. For some I imagine the flashbacks to the shaping events on the characters’ lives have struck a chord. But hopefully they have also challenged us to see the shaping influence we are on our own kids.

This does not mean we must be the perfect parent to keep from  negatively affecting our kids.  No, we can positively shape them as much (if not more) by how we deal with our sin and struggles, than in doing all the right things. So, don’t buy into the lie or the pressure that we must be perfect; God can and does use even our failures to shape them for his good.

But with that said, our words and actions do have a huge impact on our kids. From this Season 2, Episode 2 we see this through Kate’s relationship with her mom, Rebecca.

Even as an adult, Kate believes she fails to measure up to her mom’s standards. She sees her mom as everything she is not, so anytime Rebecca is around her insecurities are heightened. From her weight, to the way her house looks, how her boyfriend is perceived, and her singing and performing on stage, Kate feels she is not enough for her mom. And, therefore, not enough.

Through the flashback scenes and present day dialogue we see why. Rebecca sings beautifully, She also has a much smaller physical frame than her daughter. But the reason these are so problematic stem from her damaging words. Rebecca’s compliments of Kate come along with some form of correction or a how-to suggestion for getting better. She means it as encouragement, but these backhanded compliments fuel Kate’s feelings of inadequacy and become the source of shame she can’t get out from under.

Because of the shame, even when her boyfriend compliments or encourages her, it is never louder than the voice in her head that deems her worthless. Her whole identity hinging on her mom’s critique.

As I watched the show, it broke my heart for Kate. But it also broke my heart to know at times I have come across just like Rebecca (the mom, not my daughter Rebecca!) and have unintentionally led my daughter Rebecca (and probably others too) to feel less-than.

The mother/daughter relationship is especially tricky, and the father/son one can be too. We project onto our kids who we want them to be and push them to be better. But that measuring stick of our performance and successes can be a glaring reminder to them of where they fail to meet up to our expectations, accomplishments or appearances.  I think this occurs often when our kids do the same sports or activities we did. However, our different personality types and natural abilities also affect the way our kids see themselves compared to us.

So, Moms & Dads, do you see how this is us?

We heap shame on our kids even with well-meaning intentions. But the good thing in it being revealed is we can do something about it. That’s why seeing your sin is actually a good thing! Because only when you are aware of your sin can you confess and repent of it.

Therefore, instead of burying your failure underneath shame, or denying messing up, let’s deal honestly with our kids about the hurtful things we’ve said and will say, or the looks we’ve given. Let’s even ask them to point those things out to us; the things we aren’t even aware of. Can we do that?

By God’s grace, may we approach them with humility, be willing to listen to their perspective and make needed changes. May we start by asking for their forgiveness, and ask God (and them) to help us see when we still create insecurities in them. This is something I’m learning from my daughter. It hurts to see where my words or performance has led to insecurities in her. But I am thankful to be learning, and know it is growing ‘us’ closer.

Dealing honestly, even when it’s hard, is what will change the course of the shaping influence our sin and failures will have on our children. So let’s take a cue from ‘This is Us’ for the growth and good of our relationships by examining our hearts and living redemptively with one another.

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